Why New Year’s resolutions are a blankety-blank

“This year, my resolutions are …,”

We’ve all done it, so you may as well own it. Every year, right about this time, we all start talking about the New Year’s resolutions we’re making. We’re all going to quit smoking. We’re all going to lose weight. We’re all going to take more time for ourselves and spend less time working. We’re going to get that promotion. We’re going to live somewhere that doesn’t have boob sweat. All these resolutions are promises to ourselves that we’re going to be better next year. But are we setting ourselves up for failure? Are resolutions helpful or harmful? Why can’t we just love ourselves?

Self-harming resolutions

 

“I’m going to lose one hundred and fifteen pounds by June twentieth because I have a wedding I’m going to. I talked to this doctor online and they signed me up for a six hundred calorie per day diet. It promises results in the first two weeks!”

I wish I could say I’m kidding but that is something someone has said to me in the last twelve days. And to look at her, you would never think there’s seventy-five pounds that she needs to lose, let alone one hundred and fifteen! And sadly, she is not the only person that I know of who makes resolutions that are actually harmful. As a whole, society bombards us with commercials and images that show people getting into shape, sweating on a treadmill (in full makeup no less), buying workout gear (No, Janice, you do not need a subscription to buying workout gear), and make it seem as though you can simply jump off your couch and be that person.¬†Then they advertise crash diets, fad workouts, or magic pills that will “melt your fat away”. None of these things are good for you. And they will hurt you.

Helpful resolutions

If your goal is to achieve weight loss, look into speaking with a nutritionist. If your goal is to workout more, start small. Start walking around the dining room table, then down the street, and then perhaps look into a gym membership. Don’t try to run a 5k in February when you’ve never even made it to ten thousand steps in a day. Instead of eating less, eat smarter; look into eating habits that support your whole body. Make a routine for yourself to do meal prep one day a week. Sign up for a subscription dinner box. Yes, they can be expensive but if you’re smart about them, you can make them work. Try a few different companies and make your decision from there. You can also look into healthy snack boxes that come pre-portioned.

If your goal is to just move more, make it fun. Set a realistic goal (thirty thousand steps in a week) and reward yourself with a manicure. Or perhaps a book you’ve been wanting to read. Something that has nothing to do with clothes or numbers on a scale. I reward myself with really indulgent coffee. Technically not food and still a true pleasure for me.

Self-care resolutions

You can also make resolutions that help you to take care of yourself. Yes, the walking steps is helpful but I’m talking about routines that help you to recharge. I’ve made resolutions to meditate at least three times a week, or to save all my spare change and whatever it comes up to at the end of the year is my “getaway money”. In 2018, I’m participating in the “$5000 52 Week Money Challenge” to save five thousand dollars by the end of the year. I have no idea how I’m going to spend it, but I’m making a resolution to save it.

New Year’s resolutions are fun and, whether you achieve them or not, remember that loving yourself is the most important aspect. You don’t have to kill yourself to achieve the perfect body by February; you can still enjoy cream in your coffee. Make a resolution to love yourself no matter what and you’ve already made it further than most.

Good luck.

Ryan

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